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Saturday, May 27, 2017

The pomegranate walnuts snack and the science behind its health benefits






Featured open access scientific review on health effects of pomegranate:

Zarfeshany A, Asgary S, Javanmard SH. Potent health effects of pomegranate.
Adv Biomed Res. 2014 Mar 25;3:100. doi: 10.4103/2277-9175.129371. eCollection
2014. Review. PubMed PMID: 24800189; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC4007340.
Abstract
Accumulating data clearly claimed that Punica granatum L. (pomegranate) has several health benefits. Pomegranates can help prevent or treat various disease risk factors including high blood pressure, high cholesterol, oxidative stress, hyperglycemia, and inflammatory activities. It is demonstrated that certain components of pomegranate such as polyphenols have potential antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anticarcinogenic effects. The antioxidant potential of pomegranate juice is more than that of red wine and green tea, which is induced through ellagitannins and hydrosable tannins. Pomegranate juice can reduce macrophage oxidative stress, free radicals, and lipid peroxidation. Moreover, pomegranate fruit extract prevents cell growth and induces apoptosis, which can lead to its anticarcinogenic effects. In addition, promoter inhibition of some inflammatory markers and their production are blocked via ellagitannins. In this article, we highlight different studies on the therapeutic effects of pomegranate and their suggested mechanisms of actions.


Featured open access scientific review on health effects of walnuts:

Kris-Etherton PM. Walnuts decrease risk of cardiovascular disease: a summary of efficacy and biologic mechanisms. J Nutr. 2014 Apr;144(4 Suppl):547S-554S. doi: 10.3945/jn.113.182907. Epub 2014 Feb 5. Review. PubMed PMID: 24500935
http://jn.nutrition.org/content/144/4/547S.long
Abstract
Given the pressing need to reduce cardiovascular disease (CVD) morbidity and mortality, there has been a focus on optimizing dietary patterns to reduce the many contributing risk factors. Over the past 2 decades, many studies have been conducted that have evaluated the effects of walnut consumption on CVD risk factors. Walnuts have been shown to decrease low density lipoprotein cholesterol (by ∼9-16%) and blood pressure (diastolic blood pressure by ∼2-3 mm Hg), 2 major risk factors for CVD. In addition, walnuts improve endothelial function, decrease both oxidative stress and some markers of inflammation, and increase cholesterol efflux. The effect of walnuts on multiple CVD targets over relatively short periods of time supports recommendations for their inclusion in a heart-healthy diet.


Further reading:

Pomegranate (Wikipedia): "The pomegranate, botanical name Punica granatum, is a fruit-bearing deciduous shrub or small tree in the family Lythraceae that grows between 5 and 8 m (16 and 26 ft) tall.
The fruit is typically in season in the Northern Hemisphere from September to February,[2] and in the Southern Hemisphere from March to May. As intact arils or juice, pomegranates are used in baking, cooking, juice blends, meal garnishes, smoothies, and alcoholic beverages, such as cocktails and wine.
The pomegranate originated in the region of modern-day Iran, and has been cultivated since ancient times throughout the Mediterranean region and northern India.[3] It was introduced into Spanish America in the late 16th century and California, by Spanish settlers, in 1769.[3]
Today, it is widely cultivated throughout the Middle East and Caucasus region, north and tropical Africa, the Indian subcontinent, Central Asia, the drier parts of southeast Asia, and parts of the Mediterranean Basin.[3] It is also cultivated in parts of Arizona and California.[4] In recent years, it has become more common in the commercial markets of Europe and the Western Hemisphere.[3][4]
...read more".

Walnut (Wikipedia): "A walnut is the nut of any tree of the genus Juglans (Family Juglandaceae), particularly the Persian or English walnut, Juglans regia. Technically a walnut is the seed of a drupe or drupaceous nut, and thus not a true botanical nut. It is used for food after being processed while green for pickled walnuts or after full ripening for its nutmeat. Nutmeat of the eastern black walnut from the Juglans nigra is less commercially available, as are butternut nutmeats from Juglans cinerea. The walnut is nutrient-dense with protein and essential fatty acids.
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Keywords relevant for this post: diet, healthy diet, nutrients, nutrigenomics, nutrigenetics, nutrition, dietary supplements, open access, journal, open access journals, science journal, free journal publication, online journal, open access publishing, open access articles, science magazine, journal science, journal of science, food and nutrition, food, treatment, remedy, therapy, medicine, medication, medical treatment, relieve symptoms, relief, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory activities, pomegranate, walnuts, cardiovascular disease (CVD), LDL, HDL, blood pressure, cholesterol efflux, endothelial function, ellagitannins, free radicals, polyphenols, metabolism.

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